Course Book : #106 - HIPAA Regulations

HIPAA Regulations Update

2 contact Hours

Course # 106

Author: Monica Oram, RN, BSN

 

This course is intended for the reader to be able to achieve the following objectives:

  1. Define HIPAA

  2. Understand the purpose of HIPAA

  3. Name departments that must comply with HIPAA

  4. Identify rights patient’s have under HIPAA

  5. Identify way of communication in which HIPAA will apply to

 

What is HIPAA?

 

HIPAA in the abbreviation for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. HIPAA has a broad impact as the regulation of HIPAA affects almost every department in almost any healthcare related organization. HIPAA is the #1 information management issue among health care organizations today. It has been reported that many organizations are unprepared to meet regulations by the deadline of April 14, 2003. Many hospitals, government agencies and other covered entities must figure out what to do and when and how to achieve this goal. Any system or person who can reveal patient health information is subject to HIPAA regulations. Trading partners, such as banks and clearinghouses (billing companies)

are also subject to the security and privacy regulations in HIPAA. Criminal and civil penalties will be imposed for noncompliance. The fines are very steep if found to be in violation of HIPAA. HIPAA requires that every employee who is affected by HIPAA in the workplace must be trained on HIPAA requirements by April 14, 2003.(some portions) and October 16,2003 (for other portions)

 

HIPAA is not really new to the industry, as it has been around since 1996, when HIPAA was passed by congress in an effort to protect medical information, but there have been delays in the deadline compliance in various levels of the legislation.

 

Enacted in August of 1996, HIPAA included a wide array of provisions designed to make health insurance more affordable and accessible.

With support from health plans, hospitals and other health care businesses, Congress included provisions in HIPAA to require Health and Human Services to adopt national standards for certain electronic health care transactions, codes, identifiers and security. HIPAA also set a three deadline for Congress to enact comprehensive privacy legislation to protect medial records and other personal health information. ( PHI). When congress did not enact such legislation by August of 1999, HIPAA required Health and Human Services ( HHS) to issue health privacy regulations.

 

Security and privacy standards can promote higher quality care by ensuring consumers that their personal health information will be protected from inappropriate uses and disclosures.

 

In addition, it is predicted that under HIPAA, it can save billions of dollars each year for health care businesses’ by lowering the costs of developing and maintaining software and reducing the time and expense needed to handle health care transactions.

 

WHO MUST COMPLY?

 

Nursing

Physicians

Therapy

ALL PERSONS INVOLVED WITH ACCESS

TO PATIENT INFORMATION AND MEDICAL RECORDS.

 

If your job requires involvement to access of patient records and protected health information (PHI) then YOU ARE REQUIRED TO COMPLY with HIPAA laws and regulations.

 

Protected health information includes, but is not limited to:

  • Social security number

  • Name

  • Address

  • Phone number

  • Fax number

  • Date of birth

  • Diagnosis

  • Email address

  • Medical record number

  • Any account numbers

In 1996, the United States Congress adopted a new set of standards that set the stage for the sweeping changes in health care since the 1965 passage of the Medicare Act signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson. These changes have had substantial impact over the entire healthcare industry.

 

 

AWARENESS IS THE ONLY SOLUTION, to be certain you and your facility will be in compliance and will remain in compliance !

 

You must be aware of what these rules are and how they affect your work environment.

 

Your employees must be aware of these rules and know how to follow them.

 

You and your employees must continue to oversee your entire operation in order to maintain compliance on these issues.

 

 

Under HIPPA, civil and even criminal penalties can be imposed on organizations and individuals for wrongful disclosure or other forms of noncompliance. Wrongful disclosure is defined as either knowingly or unknowingly sharing or disclosing information without the patient/resident permission.

A facility that does not follow these rules may:

  • Be responsible for civil penalties and fines that can quickly add up to thousands of dollars.

  • Be accused of criminal violations that can result in even higher fines and penalties, and can include jail time.

  • Be excluded from participation in the Medicare Reimbursement Program.

 

Business associates who have contracts with the facility or organization must also comply with HIPAA, such as pharmacies, medical suppliers, and third party billing organizations.

Electronic Code set standards will be in place for standardized coding and electronically maintained, transmitted information.

 

 

 

HIPAA law will cover any way that information is transmitted:

  • By phone

  • In writing

  • By fax

  • By speaking

 

 

Covered Entities

 

In HIPAA, congress required health plans, health care clearinghouses, and those health care providers who conduct certain financial and administrative transactions electronically (such as eligibility, referral authorizations and claims) to comply with each set of final standards. Other businesses may voluntarily comply with the standards, but the law does not require them to do so.

 

Compliance Schedule

 

In general, the law requires covered entities to come into compliance with each set of standards within two years following adoption, except for small health plans, which have three years to come into compliance.

 

For the electronic transaction rule only, congress in 2001 enacted legislation allowing a one year extension for most covered entities provided that they submit a plan for achieving compliance. As a result, covered entities that qualify for the extension will have until October 16, 2003 to meet the compliance deadline. Small health plan entities must meet the Oct. 16, 2003 deadline also, and are not eligible for an extension under the new current law.

The legislative extension DOES NOT AFFECT THE COMPLIANCE DATES FOR THE HEALTH INFORMATION PRIVACY RULE. THE DEADLINE FOR ALL ENTITIES TO COMPLY WITH THE PATIENT PRIVACY RULE IS APRIL 14, 2003. (small health plans will have until April 14, 2004)

 

 

 

 

 

Public Law 104-191

August 21, 1996

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996

 

Public Law 104-191

104th Congress

 

The HIPAA Act Reads:

“ To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to improve portability and continuity of health insurance coverage in the group and individual markets, to combat waste, fraud, and abuse in health insurance and health care delivery, to promote the use of medical savings accounts, to improve access to long-term care services and coverage, to simplify the administration of health insurance, and for other purposes”

 

Protecting Patient Privacy

 

In April 2001, at the direction of President Bush and Health & Human Services secretary, Tommy Thompson, the first-ever federal privacy standards to protect patient’s medical records and other health information that is provided to health plans, doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers went into affect. These standards will provide patient’s with access to their medical records and have more control over how their personal health information is used and disclosed.

 

Safeguards for personal health information will need to be in place before

the deadline dates. The final rule under HIPAA establishes the privacy standards that covered entities must meet. The requirement will mandate that covered entities will have to:

  • Adopt written privacy procedures. These include a description of who has access to protected information, how it will be used within the entity, and when the information may be disclosed. Covered entities will also need to take steps to ensure that their business associates protect the privacy of health information.

  • Employees will all need to be trained and a privacy officer must be designated. Covered entities will need to train their staff in privacy procedures, and must have a privacy officer in place, all before the deadline date of compliance.

 

Boundaries Over Medical Record Use and Release

 

With few exceptions, an individual’s health information may be only used for their health care and related purposes unless the individual specifically authorizes its use for other purposes.

  • Ensuring that health information is not used for non-health related purposes. Health information covered by HIPAA rules generally may not be used for purposes not related to health care, such as disclosure to employers to make personal decisions, to life insurance companies or to financial institutions, without explicit authorization from the patient.

  • Clear, strong protection against marketing. The final privacy law of HIPAA set new restrictions and limits on the use of patient information for marketing purposes. Pharmacies, health plans and other covered entities must first obtain and individual’s specific consent before sending them any marketing materials. At the same time, the rule permits doctors and other covered entities to communicate freely with patients about treatment options and other health-related information, including disease management programs.

  • Providing the minimal amount of information necessary. In general, uses and disclosure of information will be limited to the minimum necessary for the purpose of the use or disclosure. This provision does not apply to the disclosure of medical records for treatment purposes because physicians, specialists, and other providers need access to full records to provide quality care.

 

Information Protected

 

Medical records and other individually identifiable health information used or disclosed by a covered entity in any form, whether electronically, on paper, or orally are covered in this rule. This will include relocating fax machines so information is not viewed by all in a central location, computer screen will need to be covered, or non- visible at all times from other patients, and visitors. An electronic encryption must be in place before a message can be sent electronically.

All filing cabinets with patient information contained, must be locked at all times. There are to be no “boxes” hanging outside of doors where other patient information could be deposited. All items on a bulletin board will need to be removed if it contains any patient information or identifiable information on it. All documents that are to be thrown away must be shredded before disposed in regular garbage receptacles.

Offices will need to be locked when unattended, especially if patient information is laying on a desk. All visible billing records need to be out of sight of any other person who can see them without authorization. No information can be posted on boards, walls, such as in therapy or activity rooms. Medication and Treatment books must be covered or closed when on medication carts and treatment carts when unattended. They must be removed from the carts and locked in the med room , or placed in a secure location upon completion of the med pass or treatment rounds. MDS information can no longer be posted on a marker board.

 

Access Control and Privacy Standards

 

Only individuals who “need to know” will be allowed to have access to patient’s records. When access is allowed, it will be so that only “minimally needed information” will be accessible.

 

In December 2000, HHS issued a final rule to protect the confidentiality of medical records and other personal health information. The rule limit’s the use and release of individually identifiable health information, gives the patient the right to access their medical records, restricts most disclosure of health information to the minimum needed for the intended purpose, and establishes safeguards and restrictions regarding disclosure of medical records for certain public responsibilities, such as public health, research and law enforcement. Improper usage of medical records under the new law and HIPAA guidelines are subject to criminal and civil penalties prescribed in HIPAA.

Employer Identifier

 

In May 2002, HHS issued a final rule to standardize the identifying numbers assigned to employers in the health care industry by using the existing employer identification number (EIN), which is assigned and maintained by the Internal Revenue Service. Businesses that pay wages to employees already have an EIN number. Currently, employers and businesses have been able to use different coding numbers to bill, but under HIPAA it will need to be standardized to ONLY the Unique Identifier Number. This has come about because of fraud and over billing, and duplicate billing of services by healthcare facilities, doctor’s offices, and third party suppliers.

Consumer Control Over Health Information

 

Under HIPAA’ s final rule, Patients will have significant new rights to understand and control how their health information is used.

  • Ensuring patients understand their privacy rights- Covered entities will need to provide patients with written notice of their privacy practices and patient’s privacy rights. The notice will contain information that could be useful to patients choosing a health plan, doctor, or any other provider. Patients would generally be asked to sign or acknowledge receipt of the privacy notice from direct treatment providers. In addition, patients generally must give specific authorization before entities can use or disclose protected information in most non-routine circumstances- such as releasing information to an employer or for use in marketing activities.

  • Ensuring patient access to their medical records- Patients generally have the right to be able to see and get copies of their medical records, and request amendments. In addition, a history of most non-routine disclosures must be made available to patients upon request.

  • Providing recourse and sanctions if privacy protection is violated. People will have the right to file a formal complaint with a covered provider or

Health plan, or with the Health and Human Services, about violations of

The provisions of this portion of the HIPAA law.

Accountability For Medical Records

Under HIPAA, Congress provided a statute that will impose fines and penalties for misuse of personal information.

  • Civil penalties. Health plans, providers, clearinghouses that violate these standards will be subject to civil liability.

  • Civil money penalties are $100.00 per violation, up to $25, 000 per year for each requirement or prohibition violated.

  • Criminal penalties. Congress also established criminal penalties for certain actions such as knowingly obtaining protected health information in violation of the law.

  • Criminal penalties are up to $50,000 and one year in prison for certain offenses.

  • Up to $100,000 fines and up to five years in prison if the offenses are committed under “false pretenses”

  • Up to $250,000 in fines and up to 10 years in prison if the information obtain is found to be used for commercial advantage, personal gain, or malicious harm.

What are the EXCEPTIONS to the rule?

 

The exceptions to the patient privacy rule are a combination of balancing public responsibility with privacy protections. In limited circumstances, the final rule of HIPAA law permits ( but does not require) covered entities to continue certain existing disclosures of health information without individual authorization for specific public responsibilities.

These permitted disclosures include:

  • Release of information for emergency circumstances, such as Emergency Medical Services, and Law Enforcement.

  • Release of a body to a funeral home

  • Identification of the body of a deceased person

  • Information needed for adverse incident reporting

  • Judicial and administrative proceedings

  • Activities related to national defense and security

  • Clergy may know the patients religion

  • To report abuse of neglect

  • Public health issues that involve communicable disease or safety

  • Organ donation

  • Workers Compensation

  • Coroners, medial examiners and funeral directors

 

No information may be released to friends and family without consent from the patient. This will include room lists, where the patient will have to authorize consent before anyone can be informed of patients condition. It will be permissible to give out room number or location in the facility. Nurses will be locked in to being able to only give information to authorized people, and a statement of condition will only include stable, fair, or critical. No details will be allowed to be elaborated upon, unless a consent is given by the patient to give information to a designated family member. If the patient is incapacitated, it is only permissible to release information if it is in the best interest of the patient.

 

HIPAA Has Many Purposes

 

  • Insurance coverage when employees change jobs

  • Patients and residents have more control and access to their information

  • Standards for protection of residents medical and financial information

  • National provider identifier numbers

  • Standards for electronic transmission of data

  • Strict adherence to maintaining privacy and confidentiality of all health information

  • Written information and privacy notices given to all patients and residents defining their rights under HIPAA

  • System of sanctions for any one who violates the HIPAA requirements

  • To protect and enhance the rights of consumers by providing them access to their health information and controlling its appropriate use

  • To improve quality of health care in the US by restoring trust in the health care system

 

Mental Health and Psychotherapy Notes

 

Mental Heath information and psychotherapy notes are held to a higher standard. They are NOT to be part of the patient record. Group therapy is allowed within the facility without authorization. Mental health and psychotherapy notes are to be used only by mental health professionals, and are not intended to be shared with anyone else. All other health information is considered to be sensitive and protected under HIPAA law.

 

Preserving Existing State Confidentiality Laws

 

State laws providing additional privacy protections continue to apply. The confidentiality protections are cumulative; the privacy rule will set a national “floor” of privacy standards that protect Americans, and any state law providing additional privacy protection laws will remain in effect.

 

Why HIPAA ??

 

  • No uniform Federal law to protect security and privacy of health information

  • A patchwork to fill in the gaps of existing state laws

  • 2001- Eli Lily accidentally sent email to Prozac users on an informational listserv revealing identities of other Prozac users.

  • 1996- In Tampa, a public health worker sent to two newspapers a computer disk containing the name of 4,000 HIV positive people.

  • 2000- Darryl Strawberry’s medical records from a visit to a New York hospital were reviewed 365 times. An audit determined less than 3% of those reviewing the record had even a remote connection to his care.

 

So, it is things like this and mistakes that are made that brings about new laws and changes that initiate Federal Compliance with HIPAA rules and regulations.

 

HIPAA Eligible Individual

 

HIPAA has another purpose. To guarantee health coverage for individuals who are eligible when they change jobs. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, (HIPAA) includes important new- but limited- protections for millions of working Americans.

HIPPA may:

  • Increase your ability to get health coverage for yourself and your dependents if you start a new job

  • Lower your chances of losing existing health care coverage, whether you have the coverage through a job, or through an individual health plan

  • Help you maintain continuous health coverage for yourself and your dependents when you change jobs

  • Help you buy health insurance coverage on your own if you lose coverage under an employer’s group health plan and have no other health coverage available.

 

Among its specific protections, HIPAA:

  • Limit’s the use of pre-existing condition exclusions

  • Prohibits group health plans from discriminating by denying coverage or charging extra for pre-existing conditions or poor health

  • Guarantees certain small employers, and certain individuals who lose job related coverage, the right to purchase health insurance

  • Guarantees, in most cases, that employers or individuals who purchase

Health insurance can renew the coverage regardless of any health

Condition of individuals covered under the insurance policy.

 

Misunderstandings about HIPAA

 

Although HIPAA helps protect you and your family in many ways, you should understand what HIPAA does NOT do:

  • HIPAA does NOT require employers to offer or pay for health coverage

  • HIPAA does NOT guarantee health coverage for all workers

  • HIPAA does NOT control the amount an insurer may charge for coverage

  • HIPAA does NOT require group health plans to offer specific benefits

  • HIPAA does NOT permit people to keep same health coverage they had in their old job when they move to a new job

  • HIPAA does NOT eliminate all use of pre-existing condition exclusions

  • HIPAA does NOT replace the state as the primary regulator of health insurance.

 

 

IMPORTANT NOTE:

The information in regards to health insurance coverage’s for individuals of HIPAA provisions are SEPARATE from the Administrative Simplification (AS) Provisions of HIPAA.

Administrative Simplification Provisions are intended

To reduce the cost and administrative burden of health care by making possible the standardization of electronic billing submission, and protection of patient privacy issues.

 

The provisions for health coverage are part of HIPAA, but are a separate set of provisions regarding health insurance and coverage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

REFERENCES:

Information contained within this course can be found at:

www.cms.gov/hipaa

 

Health and Human Services

www.hhs.gov/news

 

www.undertandinghipaa.com

 

www.epanurgy.com/hipaa

 

www.pdcfornurses.com

HIPAA Regulations Update

2 contact Hours

Course # 106

Author: Monica Oram, RN, BSN

 

This course is intended for the reader to be able to achieve the following objectives:

  1. Define HIPAA

  2. Understand the purpose of HIPAA

  3. Name departments that must comply with HIPAA

  4. Identify rights patient’s have under HIPAA

  5. Identify way of communication in which HIPAA will apply to

 

What is HIPAA?

 

HIPAA in the abbreviation for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. HIPAA has a broad impact as the regulation of HIPAA affects almost every department in almost any healthcare related organization. HIPAA is the #1 information management issue among health care organizations today. It has been reported that many organizations are unprepared to meet regulations by the deadline of April 14, 2003. Many hospitals, government agencies and other covered entities must figure out what to do and when and how to achieve this goal. Any system or person who can reveal patient health information is subject to HIPAA regulations. Trading partners, such as banks and clearinghouses (billing companies)

are also subject to the security and privacy regulations in HIPAA. Criminal and civil penalties will be imposed for noncompliance. The fines are very steep if found to be in violation of HIPAA. HIPAA requires that every employee who is affected by HIPAA in the workplace must be trained on HIPAA requirements by April 14, 2003.(some portions) and October 16,2003 (for other portions)

 

HIPAA is not really new to the industry, as it has been around since 1996, when HIPAA was passed by congress in an effort to protect medical information, but there have been delays in the deadline compliance in various levels of the legislation.

 

Enacted in August of 1996, HIPAA included a wide array of provisions designed to make health insurance more affordable and accessible.

With support from health plans, hospitals and other health care businesses, Congress included provisions in HIPAA to require Health and Human Services to adopt national standards for certain electronic health care transactions, codes, identifiers and security. HIPAA also set a three deadline for Congress to enact comprehensive privacy legislation to protect medial records and other personal health information. ( PHI). When congress did not enact such legislation by August of 1999, HIPAA required Health and Human Services ( HHS) to issue health privacy regulations.

 

Security and privacy standards can promote higher quality care by ensuring consumers that their personal health information will be protected from inappropriate uses and disclosures.

 

In addition, it is predicted that under HIPAA, it can save billions of dollars each year for health care businesses’ by lowering the costs of developing and maintaining software and reducing the time and expense needed to handle health care transactions.

 

WHO MUST COMPLY?

 

Nursing

Physicians

Therapy

ALL PERSONS INVOLVED WITH ACCESS

TO PATIENT INFORMATION AND MEDICAL RECORDS.

 

If your job requires involvement to access of patient records and protected health information (PHI) then YOU ARE REQUIRED TO COMPLY with HIPAA laws and regulations.

 

Protected health information includes, but is not limited to:

  • Social security number

  • Name

  • Address

  • Phone number

  • Fax number

  • Date of birth

  • Diagnosis

  • Email address

  • Medical record number

  • Any account numbers

In 1996, the United States Congress adopted a new set of standards that set the stage for the sweeping changes in health care since the 1965 passage of the Medicare Act signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson. These changes have had substantial impact over the entire healthcare industry.

 

 

AWARENESS IS THE ONLY SOLUTION, to be certain you and your facility will be in compliance and will remain in compliance !

 

You must be aware of what these rules are and how they affect your work environment.

 

Your employees must be aware of these rules and know how to follow them.

 

You and your employees must continue to oversee your entire operation in order to maintain compliance on these issues.

 

 

Under HIPPA, civil and even criminal penalties can be imposed on organizations and individuals for wrongful disclosure or other forms of noncompliance. Wrongful disclosure is defined as either knowingly or unknowingly sharing or disclosing information without the patient/resident permission.

A facility that does not follow these rules may:

  • Be responsible for civil penalties and fines that can quickly add up to thousands of dollars.

  • Be accused of criminal violations that can result in even higher fines and penalties, and can include jail time.

  • Be excluded from participation in the Medicare Reimbursement Program.

 

Business associates who have contracts with the facility or organization must also comply with HIPAA, such as pharmacies, medical suppliers, and third party billing organizations.

Electronic Code set standards will be in place for standardized coding and electronically maintained, transmitted information.

 

 

 

HIPAA law will cover any way that information is transmitted:

  • By phone

  • In writing

  • By fax

  • By speaking

 

 

Covered Entities

 

In HIPAA, congress required health plans, health care clearinghouses, and those health care providers who conduct certain financial and administrative transactions electronically (such as eligibility, referral authorizations and claims) to comply with each set of final standards. Other businesses may voluntarily comply with the standards, but the law does not require them to do so.

 

Compliance Schedule

 

In general, the law requires covered entities to come into compliance with each set of standards within two years following adoption, except for small health plans, which have three years to come into compliance.

 

For the electronic transaction rule only, congress in 2001 enacted legislation allowing a one year extension for most covered entities provided that they submit a plan for achieving compliance. As a result, covered entities that qualify for the extension will have until October 16, 2003 to meet the compliance deadline. Small health plan entities must meet the Oct. 16, 2003 deadline also, and are not eligible for an extension under the new current law.

The legislative extension DOES NOT AFFECT THE COMPLIANCE DATES FOR THE HEALTH INFORMATION PRIVACY RULE. THE DEADLINE FOR ALL ENTITIES TO COMPLY WITH THE PATIENT PRIVACY RULE IS APRIL 14, 2003. (small health plans will have until April 14, 2004)

 

 

 

 

 

Public Law 104-191

August 21, 1996

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996

 

Public Law 104-191

104th Congress

 

The HIPAA Act Reads:

“ To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to improve portability and continuity of health insurance coverage in the group and individual markets, to combat waste, fraud, and abuse in health insurance and health care delivery, to promote the use of medical savings accounts, to improve access to long-term care services and coverage, to simplify the administration of health insurance, and for other purposes”

 

Protecting Patient Privacy

 

In April 2001, at the direction of President Bush and Health & Human Services secretary, Tommy Thompson, the first-ever federal privacy standards to protect patient’s medical records and other health information that is provided to health plans, doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers went into affect. These standards will provide patient’s with access to their medical records and have more control over how their personal health information is used and disclosed.

 

Safeguards for personal health information will need to be in place before

the deadline dates. The final rule under HIPAA establishes the privacy standards that covered entities must meet. The requirement will mandate that covered entities will have to:

  • Adopt written privacy procedures. These include a description of who has access to protected information, how it will be used within the entity, and when the information may be disclosed. Covered entities will also need to take steps to ensure that their business associates protect the privacy of health information.

  • Employees will all need to be trained and a privacy officer must be designated. Covered entities will need to train their staff in privacy procedures, and must have a privacy officer in place, all before the deadline date of compliance.

 

Boundaries Over Medical Record Use and Release

 

With few exceptions, an individual’s health information may be only used for their health care and related purposes unless the individual specifically authorizes its use for other purposes.

  • Ensuring that health information is not used for non-health related purposes. Health information covered by HIPAA rules generally may not be used for purposes not related to health care, such as disclosure to employers to make personal decisions, to life insurance companies or to financial institutions, without explicit authorization from the patient.

  • Clear, strong protection against marketing. The final privacy law of HIPAA set new restrictions and limits on the use of patient information for marketing purposes. Pharmacies, health plans and other covered entities must first obtain and individual’s specific consent before sending them any marketing materials. At the same time, the rule permits doctors and other covered entities to communicate freely with patients about treatment options and other health-related information, including disease management programs.

  • Providing the minimal amount of information necessary. In general, uses and disclosure of information will be limited to the minimum necessary for the purpose of the use or disclosure. This provision does not apply to the disclosure of medical records for treatment purposes because physicians, specialists, and other providers need access to full records to provide quality care.

 

Information Protected

 

Medical records and other individually identifiable health information used or disclosed by a covered entity in any form, whether electronically, on paper, or orally are covered in this rule. This will include relocating fax machines so information is not viewed by all in a central location, computer screen will need to be covered, or non- visible at all times from other patients, and visitors. An electronic encryption must be in place before a message can be sent electronically.

All filing cabinets with patient information contained, must be locked at all times. There are to be no “boxes” hanging outside of doors where other patient information could be deposited. All items on a bulletin board will need to be removed if it contains any patient information or identifiable information on it. All documents that are to be thrown away must be shredded before disposed in regular garbage receptacles.

Offices will need to be locked when unattended, especially if patient information is laying on a desk. All visible billing records need to be out of sight of any other person who can see them without authorization. No information can be posted on boards, walls, such as in therapy or activity rooms. Medication and Treatment books must be covered or closed when on medication carts and treatment carts when unattended. They must be removed from the carts and locked in the med room , or placed in a secure location upon completion of the med pass or treatment rounds. MDS information can no longer be posted on a marker board.

 

Access Control and Privacy Standards

 

Only individuals who “need to know” will be allowed to have access to patient’s records. When access is allowed, it will be so that only “minimally needed information” will be accessible.

 

In December 2000, HHS issued a final rule to protect the confidentiality of medical records and other personal health information. The rule limit’s the use and release of individually identifiable health information, gives the patient the right to access their medical records, restricts most disclosure of health information to the minimum needed for the intended purpose, and establishes safeguards and restrictions regarding disclosure of medical records for certain public responsibilities, such as public health, research and law enforcement. Improper usage of medical records under the new law and HIPAA guidelines are subject to criminal and civil penalties prescribed in HIPAA.

Employer Identifier

 

In May 2002, HHS issued a final rule to standardize the identifying numbers assigned to employers in the health care industry by using the existing employer identification number (EIN), which is assigned and maintained by the Internal Revenue Service. Businesses that pay wages to employees already have an EIN number. Currently, employers and businesses have been able to use different coding numbers to bill, but under HIPAA it will need to be standardized to ONLY the Unique Identifier Number. This has come about because of fraud and over billing, and duplicate billing of services by healthcare facilities, doctor’s offices, and third party suppliers.

Consumer Control Over Health Information

 

Under HIPAA’ s final rule, Patients will have significant new rights to understand and control how their health information is used.

  • Ensuring patients understand their privacy rights- Covered entities will need to provide patients with written notice of their privacy practices and patient’s privacy rights. The notice will contain information that could be useful to patients choosing a health plan, doctor, or any other provider. Patients would generally be asked to sign or acknowledge receipt of the privacy notice from direct treatment providers. In addition, patients generally must give specific authorization before entities can use or disclose protected information in most non-routine circumstances- such as releasing information to an employer or for use in marketing activities.

  • Ensuring patient access to their medical records- Patients generally have the right to be able to see and get copies of their medical records, and request amendments. In addition, a history of most non-routine disclosures must be made available to patients upon request.

  • Providing recourse and sanctions if privacy protection is violated. People will have the right to file a formal complaint with a covered provider or

Health plan, or with the Health and Human Services, about violations of

The provisions of this portion of the HIPAA law.

Accountability For Medical Records

Under HIPAA, Congress provided a statute that will impose fines and penalties for misuse of personal information.

  • Civil penalties. Health plans, providers, clearinghouses that violate these standards will be subject to civil liability.

  • Civil money penalties are $100.00 per violation, up to $25, 000 per year for each requirement or prohibition violated.

  • Criminal penalties. Congress also established criminal penalties for certain actions such as knowingly obtaining protected health information in violation of the law.

  • Criminal penalties are up to $50,000 and one year in prison for certain offenses.

  • Up to $100,000 fines and up to five years in prison if the offenses are committed under “false pretenses”

  • Up to $250,000 in fines and up to 10 years in prison if the information obtain is found to be used for commercial advantage, personal gain, or malicious harm.

What are the EXCEPTIONS to the rule?

 

The exceptions to the patient privacy rule are a combination of balancing public responsibility with privacy protections. In limited circumstances, the final rule of HIPAA law permits ( but does not require) covered entities to continue certain existing disclosures of health information without individual authorization for specific public responsibilities.

These permitted disclosures include:

  • Release of information for emergency circumstances, such as Emergency Medical Services, and Law Enforcement.

  • Release of a body to a funeral home

  • Identification of the body of a deceased person

  • Information needed for adverse incident reporting

  • Judicial and administrative proceedings

  • Activities related to national defense and security

  • Clergy may know the patients religion

  • To report abuse of neglect

  • Public health issues that involve communicable disease or safety

  • Organ donation

  • Workers Compensation

  • Coroners, medial examiners and funeral directors

 

No information may be released to friends and family without consent from the patient. This will include room lists, where the patient will have to authorize consent before anyone can be informed of patients condition. It will be permissible to give out room number or location in the facility. Nurses will be locked in to being able to only give information to authorized people, and a statement of condition will only include stable, fair, or critical. No details will be allowed to be elaborated upon, unless a consent is given by the patient to give information to a designated family member. If the patient is incapacitated, it is only permissible to release information if it is in the best interest of the patient.

 

HIPAA Has Many Purposes

 

  • Insurance coverage when employees change jobs

  • Patients and residents have more control and access to their information

  • Standards for protection of residents medical and financial information

  • National provider identifier numbers

  • Standards for electronic transmission of data

  • Strict adherence to maintaining privacy and confidentiality of all health information

  • Written information and privacy notices given to all patients and residents defining their rights under HIPAA

  • System of sanctions for any one who violates the HIPAA requirements

  • To protect and enhance the rights of consumers by providing them access to their health information and controlling its appropriate use

  • To improve quality of health care in the US by restoring trust in the health care system

 

Mental Health and Psychotherapy Notes

 

Mental Heath information and psychotherapy notes are held to a higher standard. They are NOT to be part of the patient record. Group therapy is allowed within the facility without authorization. Mental health and psychotherapy notes are to be used only by mental health professionals, and are not intended to be shared with anyone else. All other health information is considered to be sensitive and protected under HIPAA law.

 

Preserving Existing State Confidentiality Laws

 

State laws providing additional privacy protections continue to apply. The confidentiality protections are cumulative; the privacy rule will set a national “floor” of privacy standards that protect Americans, and any state law providing additional privacy protection laws will remain in effect.

 

Why HIPAA ??

 

  • No uniform Federal law to protect security and privacy of health information

  • A patchwork to fill in the gaps of existing state laws

  • 2001- Eli Lily accidentally sent email to Prozac users on an informational listserv revealing identities of other Prozac users.

  • 1996- In Tampa, a public health worker sent to two newspapers a computer disk containing the name of 4,000 HIV positive people.

  • 2000- Darryl Strawberry’s medical records from a visit to a New York hospital were reviewed 365 times. An audit determined less than 3% of those reviewing the record had even a remote connection to his care.

 

So, it is things like this and mistakes that are made that brings about new laws and changes that initiate Federal Compliance with HIPAA rules and regulations.

 

HIPAA Eligible Individual

 

HIPAA has another purpose. To guarantee health coverage for individuals who are eligible when they change jobs. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, (HIPAA) includes important new- but limited- protections for millions of working Americans.

HIPPA may:

  • Increase your ability to get health coverage for yourself and your dependents if you start a new job

  • Lower your chances of losing existing health care coverage, whether you have the coverage through a job, or through an individual health plan

  • Help you maintain continuous health coverage for yourself and your dependents when you change jobs

  • Help you buy health insurance coverage on your own if you lose coverage under an employer’s group health plan and have no other health coverage available.

 

Among its specific protections, HIPAA:

  • Limit’s the use of pre-existing condition exclusions

  • Prohibits group health plans from discriminating by denying coverage or charging extra for pre-existing conditions or poor health

  • Guarantees certain small employers, and certain individuals who lose job related coverage, the right to purchase health insurance

  • Guarantees, in most cases, that employers or individuals who purchase

Health insurance can renew the coverage regardless of any health

Condition of individuals covered under the insurance policy.

 

Misunderstandings about HIPAA

 

Although HIPAA helps protect you and your family in many ways, you should understand what HIPAA does NOT do:

  • HIPAA does NOT require employers to offer or pay for health coverage

  • HIPAA does NOT guarantee health coverage for all workers

  • HIPAA does NOT control the amount an insurer may charge for coverage

  • HIPAA does NOT require group health plans to offer specific benefits

  • HIPAA does NOT permit people to keep same health coverage they had in their old job when they move to a new job

  • HIPAA does NOT eliminate all use of pre-existing condition exclusions

  • HIPAA does NOT replace the state as the primary regulator of health insurance.

 

 

IMPORTANT NOTE:

The information in regards to health insurance coverage’s for individuals of HIPAA provisions are SEPARATE from the Administrative Simplification (AS) Provisions of HIPAA.

Administrative Simplification Provisions are intended

To reduce the cost and administrative burden of health care by making possible the standardization of electronic billing submission, and protection of patient privacy issues.

 

The provisions for health coverage are part of HIPAA, but are a separate set of provisions regarding health insurance and coverage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

REFERENCES:

Information contained within this course can be found at:

www.cms.gov/hipaa

 

Health and Human Services

www.hhs.gov/news

 

www.undertandinghipaa.com

 

www.epanurgy.com/hipaa

 

www.pdcfornurses.com

HIPAA Regulations Update

2 contact Hours

Course # 106

Author: Monica Oram, RN, BSN

 

This course is intended for the reader to be able to achieve the following objectives:

  1. Define HIPAA

  2. Understand the purpose of HIPAA

  3. Name departments that must comply with HIPAA

  4. Identify rights patient’s have under HIPAA

  5. Identify way of communication in which HIPAA will apply to

 

What is HIPAA?

 

HIPAA in the abbreviation for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. HIPAA has a broad impact as the regulation of HIPAA affects almost every department in almost any healthcare related organization. HIPAA is the #1 information management issue among health care organizations today. It has been reported that many organizations are unprepared to meet regulations by the deadline of April 14, 2003. Many hospitals, government agencies and other covered entities must figure out what to do and when and how to achieve this goal. Any system or person who can reveal patient health information is subject to HIPAA regulations. Trading partners, such as banks and clearinghouses (billing companies)

are also subject to the security and privacy regulations in HIPAA. Criminal and civil penalties will be imposed for noncompliance. The fines are very steep if found to be in violation of HIPAA. HIPAA requires that every employee who is affected by HIPAA in the workplace must be trained on HIPAA requirements by April 14, 2003.(some portions) and October 16,2003 (for other portions)

 

HIPAA is not really new to the industry, as it has been around since 1996, when HIPAA was passed by congress in an effort to protect medical information, but there have been delays in the deadline compliance in various levels of the legislation.

 

Enacted in August of 1996, HIPAA included a wide array of provisions designed to make health insurance more affordable and accessible.

With support from health plans, hospitals and other health care businesses, Congress included provisions in HIPAA to require Health and Human Services to adopt national standards for certain electronic health care transactions, codes, identifiers and security. HIPAA also set a three deadline for Congress to enact comprehensive privacy legislation to protect medial records and other personal health information. ( PHI). When congress did not enact such legislation by August of 1999, HIPAA required Health and Human Services ( HHS) to issue health privacy regulations.

 

Security and privacy standards can promote higher quality care by ensuring consumers that their personal health information will be protected from inappropriate uses and disclosures.

 

In addition, it is predicted that under HIPAA, it can save billions of dollars each year for health care businesses’ by lowering the costs of developing and maintaining software and reducing the time and expense needed to handle health care transactions.

 

WHO MUST COMPLY?

 

Nursing

Physicians

Therapy

ALL PERSONS INVOLVED WITH ACCESS

TO PATIENT INFORMATION AND MEDICAL RECORDS.

 

If your job requires involvement to access of patient records and protected health information (PHI) then YOU ARE REQUIRED TO COMPLY with HIPAA laws and regulations.

 

Protected health information includes, but is not limited to:

  • Social security number

  • Name

  • Address

  • Phone number

  • Fax number

  • Date of birth

  • Diagnosis

  • Email address

  • Medical record number

  • Any account numbers

In 1996, the United States Congress adopted a new set of standards that set the stage for the sweeping changes in health care since the 1965 passage of the Medicare Act signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson. These changes have had substantial impact over the entire healthcare industry.

 

 

AWARENESS IS THE ONLY SOLUTION, to be certain you and your facility will be in compliance and will remain in compliance !

 

You must be aware of what these rules are and how they affect your work environment.

 

Your employees must be aware of these rules and know how to follow them.

 

You and your employees must continue to oversee your entire operation in order to maintain compliance on these issues.

 

 

Under HIPPA, civil and even criminal penalties can be imposed on organizations and individuals for wrongful disclosure or other forms of noncompliance. Wrongful disclosure is defined as either knowingly or unknowingly sharing or disclosing information without the patient/resident permission.

A facility that does not follow these rules may:

  • Be responsible for civil penalties and fines that can quickly add up to thousands of dollars.

  • Be accused of criminal violations that can result in even higher fines and penalties, and can include jail time.

  • Be excluded from participation in the Medicare Reimbursement Program.

 

Business associates who have contracts with the facility or organization must also comply with HIPAA, such as pharmacies, medical suppliers, and third party billing organizations.

Electronic Code set standards will be in place for standardized coding and electronically maintained, transmitted information.

 

 

 

HIPAA law will cover any way that information is transmitted:

  • By phone

  • In writing

  • By fax

  • By speaking

 

 

Covered Entities

 

In HIPAA, congress required health plans, health care clearinghouses, and those health care providers who conduct certain financial and administrative transactions electronically (such as eligibility, referral authorizations and claims) to comply with each set of final standards. Other businesses may voluntarily comply with the standards, but the law does not require them to do so.

 

Compliance Schedule

 

In general, the law requires covered entities to come into compliance with each set of standards within two years following adoption, except for small health plans, which have three years to come into compliance.

 

For the electronic transaction rule only, congress in 2001 enacted legislation allowing a one year extension for most covered entities provided that they submit a plan for achieving compliance. As a result, covered entities that qualify for the extension will have until October 16, 2003 to meet the compliance deadline. Small health plan entities must meet the Oct. 16, 2003 deadline also, and are not eligible for an extension under the new current law.

The legislative extension DOES NOT AFFECT THE COMPLIANCE DATES FOR THE HEALTH INFORMATION PRIVACY RULE. THE DEADLINE FOR ALL ENTITIES TO COMPLY WITH THE PATIENT PRIVACY RULE IS APRIL 14, 2003. (small health plans will have until April 14, 2004)

 

 

 

 

 

Public Law 104-191

August 21, 1996

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996

 

Public Law 104-191

104th Congress

 

The HIPAA Act Reads:

“ To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to improve portability and continuity of health insurance coverage in the group and individual markets, to combat waste, fraud, and abuse in health insurance and health care delivery, to promote the use of medical savings accounts, to improve access to long-term care services and coverage, to simplify the administration of health insurance, and for other purposes”

 

Protecting Patient Privacy

 

In April 2001, at the direction of President Bush and Health & Human Services secretary, Tommy Thompson, the first-ever federal privacy standards to protect patient’s medical records and other health information that is provided to health plans, doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers went into affect. These standards will provide patient’s with access to their medical records and have more control over how their personal health information is used and disclosed.

 

Safeguards for personal health information will need to be in place before

the deadline dates. The final rule under HIPAA establishes the privacy standards that covered entities must meet. The requirement will mandate that covered entities will have to:

  • Adopt written privacy procedures. These include a description of who has access to protected information, how it will be used within the entity, and when the information may be disclosed. Covered entities will also need to take steps to ensure that their business associates protect the privacy of health information.

  • Employees will all need to be trained and a privacy officer must be designated. Covered entities will need to train their staff in privacy procedures, and must have a privacy officer in place, all before the deadline date of compliance.

 

Boundaries Over Medical Record Use and Release

 

With few exceptions, an individual’s health information may be only used for their health care and related purposes unless the individual specifically authorizes its use for other purposes.

  • Ensuring that health information is not used for non-health related purposes. Health information covered by HIPAA rules generally may not be used for purposes not related to health care, such as disclosure to employers to make personal decisions, to life insurance companies or to financial institutions, without explicit authorization from the patient.

  • Clear, strong protection against marketing. The final privacy law of HIPAA set new restrictions and limits on the use of patient information for marketing purposes. Pharmacies, health plans and other covered entities must first obtain and individual’s specific consent before sending them any marketing materials. At the same time, the rule permits doctors and other covered entities to communicate freely with patients about treatment options and other health-related information, including disease management programs.

  • Providing the minimal amount of information necessary. In general, uses and disclosure of information will be limited to the minimum necessary for the purpose of the use or disclosure. This provision does not apply to the disclosure of medical records for treatment purposes because physicians, specialists, and other providers need access to full records to provide quality care.

 

Information Protected

 

Medical records and other individually identifiable health information used or disclosed by a covered entity in any form, whether electronically, on paper, or orally are covered in this rule. This will include relocating fax machines so information is not viewed by all in a central location, computer screen will need to be covered, or non- visible at all times from other patients, and visitors. An electronic encryption must be in place before a message can be sent electronically.

All filing cabinets with patient information contained, must be locked at all times. There are to be no “boxes” hanging outside of doors where other patient information could be deposited. All items on a bulletin board will need to be removed if it contains any patient information or identifiable information on it. All documents that are to be thrown away must be shredded before disposed in regular garbage receptacles.

Offices will need to be locked when unattended, especially if patient information is laying on a desk. All visible billing records need to be out of sight of any other person who can see them without authorization. No information can be posted on boards, walls, such as in therapy or activity rooms. Medication and Treatment books must be covered or closed when on medication carts and treatment carts when unattended. They must be removed from the carts and locked in the med room , or placed in a secure location upon completion of the med pass or treatment rounds. MDS information can no longer be posted on a marker board.

 

Access Control and Privacy Standards

 

Only individuals who “need to know” will be allowed to have access to patient’s records. When access is allowed, it will be so that only “minimally needed information” will be accessible.

 

In December 2000, HHS issued a final rule to protect the confidentiality of medical records and other personal health information. The rule limit’s the use and release of individually identifiable health information, gives the patient the right to access their medical records, restricts most disclosure of health information to the minimum needed for the intended purpose, and establishes safeguards and restrictions regarding disclosure of medical records for certain public responsibilities, such as public health, research and law enforcement. Improper usage of medical records under the new law and HIPAA guidelines are subject to criminal and civil penalties prescribed in HIPAA.

Employer Identifier

 

In May 2002, HHS issued a final rule to standardize the identifying numbers assigned to employers in the health care industry by using the existing employer identification number (EIN), which is assigned and maintained by the Internal Revenue Service. Businesses that pay wages to employees already have an EIN number. Currently, employers and businesses have been able to use different coding numbers to bill, but under HIPAA it will need to be standardized to ONLY the Unique Identifier Number. This has come about because of fraud and over billing, and duplicate billing of services by healthcare facilities, doctor’s offices, and third party suppliers.

Consumer Control Over Health Information

 

Under HIPAA’ s final rule, Patients will have significant new rights to understand and control how their health information is used.

  • Ensuring patients understand their privacy rights- Covered entities will need to provide patients with written notice of their privacy practices and patient’s privacy rights. The notice will contain information that could be useful to patients choosing a health plan, doctor, or any other provider. Patients would generally be asked to sign or acknowledge receipt of the privacy notice from direct treatment providers. In addition, patients generally must give specific authorization before entities can use or disclose protected information in most non-routine circumstances- such as releasing information to an employer or for use in marketing activities.

  • Ensuring patient access to their medical records- Patients generally have the right to be able to see and get copies of their medical records, and request amendments. In addition, a history of most non-routine disclosures must be made available to patients upon request.

  • Providing recourse and sanctions if privacy protection is violated. People will have the right to file a formal complaint with a covered provider or

Health plan, or with the Health and Human Services, about violations of

The provisions of this portion of the HIPAA law.

Accountability For Medical Records

Under HIPAA, Congress provided a statute that will impose fines and penalties for misuse of personal information.

  • Civil penalties. Health plans, providers, clearinghouses that violate these standards will be subject to civil liability.

  • Civil money penalties are $100.00 per violation, up to $25, 000 per year for each requirement or prohibition violated.

  • Criminal penalties. Congress also established criminal penalties for certain actions such as knowingly obtaining protected health information in violation of the law.

  • Criminal penalties are up to $50,000 and one year in prison for certain offenses.

  • Up to $100,000 fines and up to five years in prison if the offenses are committed under “false pretenses”

  • Up to $250,000 in fines and up to 10 years in prison if the information obtain is found to be used for commercial advantage, personal gain, or malicious harm.

What are the EXCEPTIONS to the rule?

 

The exceptions to the patient privacy rule are a combination of balancing public responsibility with privacy protections. In limited circumstances, the final rule of HIPAA law permits ( but does not require) covered entities to continue certain existing disclosures of health information without individual authorization for specific public responsibilities.

These permitted disclosures include:

  • Release of information for emergency circumstances, such as Emergency Medical Services, and Law Enforcement.

  • Release of a body to a funeral home

  • Identification of the body of a deceased person

  • Information needed for adverse incident reporting

  • Judicial and administrative proceedings

  • Activities related to national defense and security

  • Clergy may know the patients religion

  • To report abuse of neglect

  • Public health issues that involve communicable disease or safety

  • Organ donation

  • Workers Compensation

  • Coroners, medial examiners and funeral directors

 

No information may be released to friends and family without consent from the patient. This will include room lists, where the patient will have to authorize consent before anyone can be informed of patients condition. It will be permissible to give out room number or location in the facility. Nurses will be locked in to being able to only give information to authorized people, and a statement of condition will only include stable, fair, or critical. No details will be allowed to be elaborated upon, unless a consent is given by the patient to give information to a designated family member. If the patient is incapacitated, it is only permissible to release information if it is in the best interest of the patient.

 

HIPAA Has Many Purposes

 

  • Insurance coverage when employees change jobs

  • Patients and residents have more control and access to their information

  • Standards for protection of residents medical and financial information

  • National provider identifier numbers

  • Standards for electronic transmission of data

  • Strict adherence to maintaining privacy and confidentiality of all health information

  • Written information and privacy notices given to all patients and residents defining their rights under HIPAA

  • System of sanctions for any one who violates the HIPAA requirements

  • To protect and enhance the rights of consumers by providing them access to their health information and controlling its appropriate use

  • To improve quality of health care in the US by restoring trust in the health care system

 

Mental Health and Psychotherapy Notes

 

Mental Heath information and psychotherapy notes are held to a higher standard. They are NOT to be part of the patient record. Group therapy is allowed within the facility without authorization. Mental health and psychotherapy notes are to be used only by mental health professionals, and are not intended to be shared with anyone else. All other health information is considered to be sensitive and protected under HIPAA law.

 

Preserving Existing State Confidentiality Laws

 

State laws providing additional privacy protections continue to apply. The confidentiality protections are cumulative; the privacy rule will set a national “floor” of privacy standards that protect Americans, and any state law providing additional privacy protection laws will remain in effect.

 

Why HIPAA ??

 

  • No uniform Federal law to protect security and privacy of health information

  • A patchwork to fill in the gaps of existing state laws

  • 2001- Eli Lily accidentally sent email to Prozac users on an informational listserv revealing identities of other Prozac users.

  • 1996- In Tampa, a public health worker sent to two newspapers a computer disk containing the name of 4,000 HIV positive people.

  • 2000- Darryl Strawberry’s medical records from a visit to a New York hospital were reviewed 365 times. An audit determined less than 3% of those reviewing the record had even a remote connection to his care.

 

So, it is things like this and mistakes that are made that brings about new laws and changes that initiate Federal Compliance with HIPAA rules and regulations.

 

HIPAA Eligible Individual

 

HIPAA has another purpose. To guarantee health coverage for individuals who are eligible when they change jobs. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, (HIPAA) includes important new- but limited- protections for millions of working Americans.

HIPPA may:

  • Increase your ability to get health coverage for yourself and your dependents if you start a new job

  • Lower your chances of losing existing health care coverage, whether you have the coverage through a job, or through an individual health plan

  • Help you maintain continuous health coverage for yourself and your dependents when you change jobs

  • Help you buy health insurance coverage on your own if you lose coverage under an employer’s group health plan and have no other health coverage available.

 

Among its specific protections, HIPAA:

  • Limit’s the use of pre-existing condition exclusions

  • Prohibits group health plans from discriminating by denying coverage or charging extra for pre-existing conditions or poor health

  • Guarantees certain small employers, and certain individuals who lose job related coverage, the right to purchase health insurance

  • Guarantees, in most cases, that employers or individuals who purchase

Health insurance can renew the coverage regardless of any health

Condition of individuals covered under the insurance policy.

 

Misunderstandings about HIPAA

 

Although HIPAA helps protect you and your family in many ways, you should understand what HIPAA does NOT do:

  • HIPAA does NOT require employers to offer or pay for health coverage

  • HIPAA does NOT guarantee health coverage for all workers

  • HIPAA does NOT control the amount an insurer may charge for coverage

  • HIPAA does NOT require group health plans to offer specific benefits

  • HIPAA does NOT permit people to keep same health coverage they had in their old job when they move to a new job

  • HIPAA does NOT eliminate all use of pre-existing condition exclusions

  • HIPAA does NOT replace the state as the primary regulator of health insurance.

 

 

IMPORTANT NOTE:

The information in regards to health insurance coverage’s for individuals of HIPAA provisions are SEPARATE from the Administrative Simplification (AS) Provisions of HIPAA.

Administrative Simplification Provisions are intended

To reduce the cost and administrative burden of health care by making possible the standardization of electronic billing submission, and protection of patient privacy issues.

 

The provisions for health coverage are part of HIPAA, but are a separate set of provisions regarding health insurance and coverage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

REFERENCES:

Information contained within this course can be found at:

www.cms.gov/hipaa

 

Health and Human Services

www.hhs.gov/news

 

www.undertandinghipaa.com

 

www.epanurgy.com/hipaa

 

www.pdcfornurses.com